Cassiopeia IC 1795

Cassiopeia

Cassiopeia IC 1795
Click to Enlarge : Image ©2012: Don Goldman

Cassiopeia has to be one ‘the’ most gorgeous names for a constellation, it’s named after the queen of Aethiopia. Cassiopeia was the wife of Cepheus, King of Aethiopia and mother of Princess Andromeda. Cepheus and Cassiopeia were placed next to each other among the stars, along with Andromeda. She was placed in the sky as a punishment for her boast that Andromeda was more beautiful than the Nereids; she was forced to wheel around the North Celestial Pole on her throne, spending half of her time clinging to it so she does not fall off..sounds tricky.

Wendy Bureau wrote a beautiful poem called Cassiopeia…

Floating with ‘his’ head in the stars
He wears such placid demeanour
Looking to the constellation
His heart hopes but to redeem her

For ‘she’ is one of vanity
And that of unrivalled beauty
Yet burning bright, she owns the sky
Themed era, continuity

Although her presence visible
Forming a “W” or crown
Cassiopeia’s destined future
Twas ‘pon a chair, upside down

Perhaps there is some truth
Alive and fresh within the tale
So vain, perceived as vulgar
Now justice, Beauty has fared

As time has simply elapsed
Decrepit memories linger strong
Cassiopeia forever remains
Of ‘her’ beauty ‘he’ still longs

©2012 Wendy Bureau

Now for the constellation Technical Stuff:

Cassiopeia is a constellation in the northern sky, it is easily recognizable due to its distinctive ‘W’ shape, formed by five bright stars. It is bordered by Andromeda to the south, Perseus to the southeast, and Cepheus to the north. She is opposite the Big Dipper, and from northern latitudes can be seen at her clearest in early November.

This beautiful colourful cosmic image above features the glowing gas and obscuring dust clouds in IC 1795, a star forming region in the northern constellation Cassiopeia. The nebula’s colours were created by adopting the Hubble false-colour palette for mapping narrow emission from oxygen, hydrogen, and sulphur atoms to blue, green and red colors, and further blending the data with images of the region recorded through broadband filters. Not far on the sky from the famous Double Star Cluster in Perseus, IC 1795 is itself located next to IC 1805, the Heart Nebula, as part of a complex of star forming regions that lie at the edge of a large molecular cloud. Located just over 6,000 light-years away, the larger star forming complex sprawls along the Perseus spiral arm of our Milky Way Galaxy. At that distance, this picture would span about 70 light-years across IC 1795.

[Source :APOD, Wikipedia & Various]
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s