The Hunger Moon


After what has been another cloudy month with little or no viewing of the moon, it was only on its final days that I manged to capture the February Full Moon. This is traditionally called the Full Snow Moon by the native tribes of the north and east because of the usually heavy snow falls in February, but for me the name some American tribes referred to this Moon that I like the most is The Hunger Moon, namely because of the harsh weather conditions in their area that made hunting very difficult

These are just two of the Full Moon Names for February, but as you can see from below the list goes on…

  • Colonial American Trapper’s Moon
  • Chinese Budding Moon
  • American Indian (Cherokee) Bone Moon
  • American Indian (Choctaw) Little Famine Moon
  • American Indian (Dakota Sioux) Moon of the Raccoon, Moon When Trees Pop
  • Celtic Moon of Ice
  • English Medieval Storm Moon
  • Neo Pagan Snow Moon
  • Micmac people in eastern Canada Snow-blinding Moon
  • San Ildefonso of the Southwest Wind Moon
  • Kutenai of the Northwest Blackbear Moon

February full moon can assume any number of different names, and the list could go on and on the further I dig into the history of Full Moon Names, maybe I’ll show more when the Storm Moon of March 2013 appears… or as some call it The Death Moon

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23 thoughts on “The Hunger Moon”

  1. I have always loved the many ways that humans have had to interact with the moon and I am fascinated by the names that you mention, and others, used by Native Americans to define the full moon. Thank you.

  2. Lovely photo, and great post Carl. I was out briefly earlier this evening, playing with camera settings to try and capture this harsh full moon, but got nothing as good as this 🙂 you’ve inspired me with all those names…..

      1. You’re fortunate then, we’ve had crazy-cloudy evenings! Late night, however, I stepped out for a hopeful glimpse of an ISS passover, and just as I was about to give up I caught a sighting through the clouds…only for a couple of seconds, but I think that it was so brief made it even more exciting!

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