Tag Archives: Moon over leeds

Wolf Moon

After not seeing the moon in hardly any of its glory for the whole of January amid these cold and deep snows of midwinter…”at last” I’m glad to say, that on its first Fullcast of 2013 she reveals her ‘Full’ glory over Leeds for me to capture… I hope those wolf packs are howling hungrily outside their Indian villages tonight, thus giving their name to this January full Moon. Although sometimes it was also referred to as the Old Moon, or the Moon After Yule, some also called it the Full Snow Moon, but most tribes applied that name to the next Moon….lets hope we see the Snow Moon in February, but until then, lets howl at this majestic Wolf Moon.The 1st Fullcast of 2013

Beaver Moon

UPDATED IMAGE : The Moon & Jupiter with 3 Galilean Moons 

The Moon & Jupiter with 3 of her Galilean Moons 28.11.12 [Click to Enlarge]
The Beaver Moon 27 - 28th November 2012 ©Carl Milner MilnersBlog 1
The Beaver Moon

The Beaver Moon according to North American folklore, is the first full moon in November, which for us in the England is the 27-28th of November, and although there was plenty of cloud cover the moon did manage to make an appearance this month, something we missed when it’s closely related Hunters Moon was supposed to appear in October. The Beaver moon can also be called the Frost moon or the Frosty Moon, both of which I prefer.

The Beaver Moon 27 - 28th November 2012 ©Carl Milner MilnersBlog 1
Eye of the Moon

My other Moon related blogs Super Moon | Shark Moon | Moon Olympics | Harvest Moon

The History of Beaver Moon

Two reasons are given for the coupling of the November moon with the flat-tailed aquatic animal: November is a month when many hunters used to set leghold traps for beaver,and November is a month when many beaver families are especially active in rebuilding their beaver lodges and dams. Much of the mammals’ building and repair work takes place by moonlight, because the beaver is primarily nocturnal. Both explanations implicate November’s position as the last full month before the coming of winter, as beaver (which do not hibernate) need to have ready access to food during the cold months, and need to grow an especially lush pelt of fur so as to be prepared. By the traditional valuation standards of the fur trade, a late-fall beaver pelt was worth more than a pelt harvested during other seasons of the year. 

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